Things I’d love to discuss

Using GIT
I “get” GIT–I see the utility–I see the logic–I see why it’s great. But I’d love some discussion on how to start using it, what are some preferred GIT clients, and what the best-GIT-practices are. If this conversation could be combined with a western-twanged series of puns on the word “git,” that would be ideal.

Digital Scholarly Editions
This is my main DH interest at the moment. I would love to talk about:

  • Issues of encoding
  • What software platforms people are using (Islandora, Omeka, by-hand?)
  • Excellent, and execrable, examples of digital scholarly editions
  • Issues of copyright (i.e. “Do ALL digital editions have to be out of copyright???”)
  • What kinds of scholarly apparatus do digital editions facilitate that were harder or impossible in paper editions?
  • Multi-media digital editions

Working without institutional infrastructure
AKA, when you’re more alt than ac :)
For the many of us who are still on the hunt for the permanent position, how do we think about the issues of our digital work differently? For example, in a workshop I was once in, someone said: “This is what you’ll need to tell your design team…” What about when we ARE our team? What are the dangers of developing digital tools, editions, creations of any kind on resources provided by a university where you are only a temporary employee? How do we access resources? How do our grant applications differ? How do we access the support systems we need to make our work…work?

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About PhDeviate

@PhDeviate I teach English, with a focus on PoCo--specifically Puerto Rican diasporic literature. American Studies, narrative, and theory, too! I'm very interested in the creation of digital editions.

5 thoughts on “Things I’d love to discuss

  1. Cool ideas, Marta.

    Did you see that one of the Friday workshops is on cool uses of Git? http://chnm2012.thatcamp.org/workshops/ Not that it would preclude a Saturday session.

    > What are the dangers of developing digital tools, editions, creations of any kind on resources provided by a university where you are only a temporary employee?

    I may be in a slightly different boat than some people to whom the “temporary” label applies – I’m a contractor rather than an adjunct or post-doc – but I would imagine that there’s significant overlap in the concerns here. I’d be happy to be part of that conversation.

  2. I did see that. (Now I don’t remember if that’s what I signed up for.) My fear is that the workshop might be too advanced for a git-beginner.

    And yes, I think there’s significant overlap in contractor! So yes!

  3. The last idea in particular is a great one, and one that might be applicable even to folks who work in an institution but have no institutional support–slightly different than what you’re describing, but there’s overlap there, too.

  4. I completely agree, Sarah, and adjuncts and temps are often IN institutions, sometimes the same one for a long time, but without the access (formally or informally) to the same resources as permanent folks…

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